Blog with Masonboro Realty

October 11, 2019

                   

The 30-year fixed-mortgage fell 8 basis points this week, averaging 3.57%, Freddie Mac reports. The lower rates are drawing out more home buyers in the fall market.

“Despite the economic slowdown due to weakening manufacturing and corporate investment, the consumer side of the economy remains on solid ground,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “The 50-year low in the unemployment rate combined with low mortgage rates has led to increased home buyer demand this year. Much of this strength is coming from entry-level buyers—the first-time home buyer share of the loans Freddie Mac purchased in 2019 is 46%, a two-decade high.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages with mortgage rates for the week ending Oct. 10:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.57%, with an average 0.6 point, falling from last week’s 3.65% average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.90%.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.05%, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 3.14% average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 4.29%.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 3.35%, with an average 0.3 point, dropping from last week’s 3.38% average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 4.07%.
                     

Source: 

Freddie Mac

Posted by Jerry Bailey on October 12th, 2019 5:34 AM
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Listings Photo
¤2,300,000.00
8736 Bald Eagle Lane

Wilmington, NC 28411



Beds: 4 Rooms: 4
Full Baths: 4 Sq. Ft.: 4733
Garage: 0 Built: 2012
 

This is a new listing that
I thought you might be
interested in. Visit this
listing online to see more
photos of the property,
Google? Earth satellite
images, and much more.
 

If you have any questions
about this property or
require more information,
please feel free to call.

Lori Speight
Masonboro Realty, Inc.
9102006268
Masonboro.proiwebsites.com



 
  Visit this listing here
Posted by Lori Speight on September 16th, 2019 11:46 PM

September 16, 2019

                     

Fewer new homes are being built with a fireplace, a sign the cold-weather amenity is falling out of favor with home buyers. A record low percentage of newly constructed single-family homes—41%—last year included a fireplace, according to an analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data from the National Association of Home Builders. The share of single-family homes with fireplaces has been declining since 2015, the NAHB reports.

“An obvious explanation for the declining trend is that builders are foregoing fireplaces in some of their homes so they can bring them in at prices their customers can afford,” the NAHB reports on its Eye on Housing blog. “Keeping new homes affordable has become a considerable challenge lately.”

Fireplaces are usually considered a desirable amenity but not a must-have, the NAHB notes. Fifty-five percent of buyers rate gas-burning fireplaces as desirable, while 48% say the same of wood-burning fireplaces as desirable, according to the survey. That places such features in the middle of the list of decorative features most sought-after in terms of desirability, according to the NAHB’s “What Home Buyers Really Want” survey. However, only 16% of buyers say either type of fireplace is essential in a home purchase.

Fireplaces are the most uncommon home feature in the lower price points of the market. For example, just 7% of new single-family homes started in 2018 that were priced under $150,000 had fireplaces. On the other hand, more than 60% of homes priced at $500,000 or above had a fireplace.

         
  NAHB fireplace map. Visit source link at the end of this article for more information.

    © National Association of Home Builders  

  
      
      

                     

Source: 

Share of New Homes With Fireplaces Drop to Record Low,” National Association of Home Builders’ Eye on Housing blog (Sept. 16, 2019)  

                     

                                                       

       

Posted by Jerry Bailey on September 16th, 2019 8:36 PM

Can Mortgage Debt Increase Your Life Expectancy?

August 20, 2019

Debt can be stressful, and stress can be bad for your health. But some debt may actually be good for your health and even prolong your life, a new study from LendingTree suggests.

Researchers evaluated 797 U.S. counties on how various forms of debt—from mortgages to student loans—can possibly influence a person’s health and even life expectancy.

Notably, researchers found that a higher mortgage debt relative to income is linked with a higher life expectancy.

“That trend reaffirms the idea that homeownership is ultimately a good thing. This is despite the fact that a mortgage is one of the biggest financial decisions and burdens a person will take on in their lifetime,” researchers note.

Other forms of debt—like auto debt and personal loan debt—did not have the same link and actually generally corresponded with lower life expectancies, according to the study.

Counties with the highest life expectancy and their financial characteristics

Posted by Jerry Bailey on August 20th, 2019 9:38 PM

August 1, 2019

                  

The home may look great, but if you don’t get this one thing right, buyers won’t be buying, real estate pros say. And that all centers around the smell—the sense that too many home sellers neglect to pay attention to.

Some home sellers may be noseblind to their home’s scent, and they need the real estate professional to offer a fresh unbiased opinion.

“One of the easiest ways to evoke pleasant feelings about a space is to enhance the way it smells,” Ben Creamer, a managing broker in Chicago, told realtor.com®. “It’s often the first thing a person will notice upon entering a space—and it’s one of the things that, when done poorly, can kill a sale no matter how beautiful the home.”

What If Your Listing Stinks?

Good Smells, Bad Smells in Real Estate

How to Create Scent Appeal

To freshen up the smell, scrub all surfaces, wash all rugs, and have the carpets cleaned, suggests Barb Boehler, a real estate professional in Madison, Wis. “Until this is done, you’ll only be masking smells,” she says.

Real estate professionals offer some of the following tips:

  • Clean the fridge: Clean out the refrigerator, which could be a culprit of any bad scents. Lisa Jacobs, an organizing professional and founder of Imagine It Done, suggests leaving a fresh box of baking soda on a shelf to help remove any lingering odors.
  • Carpet cleaning: Carpets and rugs can be a culprit of smells. Get carpets and rugs shampooed or steam-cleaned regularly, and particularly prior to an open house, suggests Jennifer Snyder, owner of Neat as a Pin Organizing & Cleaning.
  • Bake for a smell: Cedric Stewart, a residential sales consultant in Washington, D.C., told realtor.com® that he likes to take out pumpkin or banana bread from the oven prior to an open house. “This provides a great smell and treats seem to stick in the buyers’ mind after they leave,” he says. He says he’ll sometimes brew a fresh pot of coffee to go with it too.
  • Use soap: Gather up all those unused bars of fancy soap over the years and place them in a pretty bowl on a bathroom counter, suggests Creamer. “It can fill a room with a remarkably clean, fresh scent for weeks,” he says. “You can even hide a bar or two in a walk-in closet to freshen the space.” Another trick to freshen up confined spaces: Use laundry dryer sheets, suggests Ben Mizes, a real estate professional in St. Louis. Tuck a dryer sheet in closets or other confined spaces to help make them smell like fresh laundry, he says.

                     

Source: 

The One Thing That Can Make or Break How People Feel About Your House,” realtor.com® (July 31, 2019)

Posted by Jerry Bailey on August 1st, 2019 5:49 PM

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